Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Hunter Haley on Unsplash

An article about Jobber’s IPO this year got us thinking. Can indoor positioning enable the future of home services? Our answer might be visionary, but it’s a clear YES.

So lets’s briefly review what the home services industry is and what Jobber does, before we dive into envision a futuristic experience for home services.

Home Services Industry & Jobber

Home service professionals work mostly on residential homes. They provide plumbing, flooring, landscaping, concrete, moving and storage, and more. While the industry is comprised of small businesses, the sheer volume of those adds up. …


Image for post
Image for post

With many prominent thinkers, e.g. Yuval Harari, highlighting the potential negative use cases of pandemic technologies post-Covid-19, some of our customers are thinking about the potential positive ones.

Having developed Proximity Monitor, a contact tracing and social distancing solution currently being deployed by EY, we often get asked the following question: “This is great for the pandemic, but what am I supposed to do with the solution afterwards?”

Fortunately, other clients offer us the answers by saying: “This pandemic tech is cool, but I would like to use it for X afterwards.”

So here is our list of 10 things you can do with contact tracing tech after the pandemic…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Compare Fibre on Unsplash

Tired of organising or attending the Xth virtual beer with your team? Try out our latest discovery: GeoGuessr.

With the second pandemic wave in full force and unlimited home office, many team leaders wonder how to keep their employees engaged. Socializing is a big part of bonding as a team, especially for teams and startups that have new members. People do not know each other very well and psychological safety, key for successful team work, is still low and requires constant work.

So what can replace the monthly salary beer with colleagues? A virtual beer is getting slightly awkward, especially when you have introverted or new team members.


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash

Optimism and wishful thinking are what psychologists call cognitive biases:

“A cognitive bias is a systematic error in thinking that occurs when people are processing and interpreting information in the world around them and affects the decisions and judgments that they make.”
-
Verywell Mind

The ​ optimism bias leads to us to assign higher probability to positive outcomes and lower probability to negative outcomes. The wishful thinking bias or confirmation bias makes us more receptive to facts upholding our initial beliefs and less receptive to opposing facts. …


Image for post
Image for post

With the second pandemic wave raging across the globe and a slow/selective vaccine rollout, it is still early days before we are back to business as usual. Having delivered Forkbeard’s pandemic solution to several of EY’s clients across hundreds of users, we continue to work hard on our Proximity Monitor App. This is the problem and our solution as of today.

The Problem

So far private and public institutions have been either setting up call centers or deploying pandemic technologies. With call centers being costly and slow, many governments initially attempted to develop their own contact tracing apps and technologies.

With iOS and Android restricting data collection of Apps when in background, many private solutions suffer from technological limitations. The most common ones are: low accuracy, no in-background and screen-off capabilities and lack of privacy protection. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Ryunosuke Kikuno on Unsplash

The compounding of performance, cost, sustainability and scalability makes Forkbeard’s technology unrivalled for indoor positioning. This would be the elevator pitch summed up in one sentence. However, since we still have 50 seconds left, let us explain why.

The Problem

Most indoor positioning technologies/companies and professional athletes have one thing in common: they tend to excel at one discipline only. Common indoor positioning technologies are either accurate (e.g. UWB), require little infrastructure (e.g. magnetic), support unlimited number of mobile devices (e.g. sound) or can be enabled with low cost infrastructure/beacons (e.g. BLE). You can have a look at our indoor positioning tech comparison for a detailed overview. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Alexandre Debiève on Unsplash

Author: Alexander Saftschuk

In Part 1 we explored the requirements for a technology that could be used to build the indoor Google Maps. By analysing what made other navigation solutions (GPS and search engines) successful, we were able to identify eight dimensions ranging from accuracy, to cost and scalability.

This blog post will evaluate the technological contenders against each other on the eight dimensions we have previously determined. To keep it simple we’ll use a table to compare the different technologies that you can subsequently use to evaluate different indoor positioning technologies.

Currently there are several different approaches to solve the indoor navigation problem. These range from basic WiFi networks up to futuristic VR/AR mapping at Facebook’s Reality Labs. …


Author: Alexander Saftschuk

Image for post
Image for post
Source: PublicDomainPictures

We have managed to figure out how to build airplanes and how to fly. We have invented the internet and can communicate with people on the other side of the world. We have even launched satellites and rockets into space and are thinking about colonising Mars. But despite spending almost 90% of our time indoors (not to mention present times with Covid-19) we still do not have an app that allows us to navigate any building we enter. We are left with the tools of caveman when it comes to navigating the indoors: entering a building and then searching and asking our way to our point of interest. …


Author: Alexander Saftschuk

Forkbeard’s CTO Wilfred Booij was recently interviewed on the Mr. Beacon Podcast about the company’s origin and ultrasound indoor positioning technology. From dining with Stephen Hawking during his PhD at Cambridge to Forkbeard’s technology bringing the GPS revolution indoors, the topics were wide ranging. Below you will find a summary of the key questions posed by the host Steve Statler and our Wilfred Boij’s answers. In case you would like to listen to the whole podcast, you can do that here.

Image for post
Image for post

Questions and Answers were paraphrased and supplemented with additional information for clarity and summary purposes.

How did Forkbeard originate?

In January 2019 Forkbeard was spun out of Sonitor which has been focusing on indoor positioning systems (IPS) in the healthcare market for over 20 years. Sonitor uses Bluetooth Low Energy and ultrasound beacons and tags to achieve high zone accuracy (e.g. notify staff if a patient has left his bed). For this to work, Sonitor installs the beacons in a way that corresponds to the zones relevant to a use case (e.g. patient’s bed). The dream was always to decouple infrastructure from use cases and move towards software-defined zones. This would mean that regardless of where and how you installed the infrastructure you can draw an arbitrary number of zones afterwards. …

About

Forkbeard Technologies

Forkbeard is building the world’s leading indoor positioning platform by combining Bluetooth Low Energy and ultrasound technologies.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store